Food

Recipe: How to Make Dessert Hummus

A photograph of the author, Erin Snow.

By Erin Snow

February 17, 2016

Recipe: How to Make Dessert Hummus

2016 is the International Year of Pulses, and to help celebrate we’re sharing a sweet twist on a savory treat.

One pulse—the chickpea—is perhaps best known for its starring role in hummus, a traditional Middle Eastern dip. With a mild, almost buttery taste, chickpeas go as well with peanut butter and honey as they do with lemon juice and tahini.   

With just a few ingredients, dessert hummus is easy to make.
With just a few ingredients, dessert hummus is easy to make.

This easy-to-make dessert hummus is reminiscent of raw cookie dough in both texture and taste, and this recipe can be modified for special dietary needs, including vegan and allergy.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 3-4 tablespoons of peanut butter (or other nut butter)
  • 3-4 tablespoons of agave nectar (or honey)
  • 1/3 cup chocolate chips (choose dairy-free for vegan recipe)
  • 1-4 tablespoons water (may also use milk, almond milk or coconut milk)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • Dippable food of choice—consider apples, graham crackers, pretzels, cookies

Directions:

  1. Combine chickpeas, peanut butter, agave and vanilla in a food processor and process until smooth.
  2. Add water, milk or non-dairy milk and continue to blend until desired consistency is reached.
  3. Stir in chocolate chips.
  4. Serve with favorite dippables and enjoy!  
The protein-rich chickpea is nutritious for humans and livestock.
The protein-rich chickpea is nutritious for humans and livestock.

Pulse Points:

  • Dried seeds, pulses are members of the legume family. The most common pulses include edible beans, dried peas, lentils and chickpeas, also called garbanzo beans.
  • Pulses are highly nutritious. They contain proteins, micronutrients and B vitamins.
  • Farmers can eat and sell what they grow, so pulses contribute to both income and food security.
  • Livestock can feed on post-harvest crop residues, such as stalks, stems, leaves and seed pods, and ultimately enrich the soil with their manure.