Return to World Ark Blog Landing

Read the original version of this post in Spanish below (Español)

I learned all about the Internet, I was amazed at the variety of woven clothing there was to make; I saw new shawls, sweaters, scarves and designs for all kinds of clothes and goods. I copied the photos and saved them to my USB so I could look at them later, which I learned from Heifer. Then I learned to copy the pictures to Word and can write and make notes and it is all so much easier.

– Isabel Subia, 52, president of the Provincial Association Ricchary Warmi of Azángaro.

Roughly 70 percent of people in developed countries have access to the Internet, but in developing countries, only 24 percent have access to this technology. Some countries have a rate as low as six percent.

Photo courtesy of Heifer International. Photo courtesy of Heifer International.

There is a huge "digital divide" that separates rural peoples from other demographics from having access to the Internet, computers and phones. Women, especially rural women who already suffer from hunger and poverty, are particularly impacted by this divide.

Heifer International Peru is working to reduce this gap faced by many of our farmer families. We design our projects to include information and communications technology (ICT) to support improved infrastructure for communities. The equipment and training women and farmers receive not only provides access for them individually; it also helps build a stronger, more sustainable program and is used as a development tool for these remote villages.

caption Project participant using a computer for the first time in an ICT workshop in Marcapata, Cusco, Peru. Photo courtesy of Heifer International.

Heifer Peru: Providing innovative solutions and tools for women

Since November 2012, Heifer Peru has been implementing the ICT project for many of its rural development project areas. The focus is on the people, not the technology or machines. For example, 39 women farmers in Puno and Cusco who participated in the ICT project have drastically changed their outlook on life. Before their involvement, they felt insecure and afraid to speak out or participate because of their limited education.

After engaging in the ICT project, they felt motivated and capable. We trained them to use computers, laptops, printers, cameras and other technological supplies. It wasn't always easy! They had to learn to use a mouse, which was a new but fun challenge. And they learned about the World Wide Web for the first time. They built time into their busy schedules every week to practice their new skills.

Now many members of women's artisan handicraft groups in Puno and Cusco are using the technology training and equipment to improve how they market their goods. They are promoting their products online and learning new skills and designs to improve their craftsmanship and products.

caption "We have learned to type on the computer, create accounts for our clothing prices, send files, share photos, send emails, chat and use Facebook to market our products!" – Mamani Lucia (43), Puno Women's Group, Conduriri Chapi Artisan Association. Photo courtesy of Heifer International.

Proving most useful, the women are able to access information on the newest fashion trends – this helps them better understand the regional and global client demand, which is especially beneficial for the exclusive Alpaca garment trade. In the broad network of Puno alone, this information is being shared with more 100 artisan women's organizations.

Lack of time, money and poor road conditions now cease to be an obstacle for these women to get in touch with their clients. And now they're connecting to other artisan women's groups in villages outside their region. This is creating a chain of  connection for women who would have otherwise never known each other. Through this technology, using email accounts, Facebook and YouTube, women are virtually leaving their villages without having to walk the hundreds of miles on dangerous paths and in cold weather to meet other women.

"The application of [ICT] has opened many doors. Thanks to the trainings, we now have catalogs to display our products, Facebook, a YouTube channel where we can show our work and an email address where people can ask about our products. Our next hope and plan is to get more training so we can sell our products online.”

The voice of the women are heard everywhere

The technology doesn’t just stop with computers and training: Heifer is also supporting a radio station in the Puno region of Peru. Women are sharing their stories of hope and success. Many women who can’t attend the trainings or who remain in remote areas without access to other women or resources are able to listen to the radio shows. The radio reaches far and wide and is normally the only form of information from the outside world. One radio program is called “Our Voices.”

caption Eufemia Espercilla (28) speaks to listeners in the radio station, broadcasted with support from Heifer International Peru. Photo courtesy of Heifer International.

Now we too are leaders and have a radio show! We encourage more women to join our artisan association, which we call "Three Alpaquitas." Now, women know that they are not alone. Women can excel with their handicrafts if they are organized. We talk about improving our skills so women can do it from within their homes when they can’t leave.

– Eufemia Espercilla, president of the artisan association Tres Alpaquitas in Marcapata, Cusco, Peru.

Women creating information

With all these experiences women artisans went from just receiving inputs and sharing resources to becoming generators of life-changing information in their homes and villages. This allows more women artisans to improve their lives, and over 17 groups are able to access more information to educate, strengthen and empower.

These advances are leading to dreams coming true – and new dreams getting bigger. Women who learned handicrafts at a very young age simply as part of their culture and traditions are now creating their own branding and businesses. These brands and businesses are starting to be a player in the local and regional markets - and the women hope to expand globally.

Photo courtesy of Heifer International. Photo courtesy of Heifer International.

Two local groups that you can check out online are:

"Natural Pacha" and "Three Alpaquitas" in Cusco and Puno - Check them out! “Like” their Facebook page! Spread the word about these amazing women and their beautiful products.

These projects represent the way that Heifer is working with rural farmers to help bring their lives into the 21st century while preserving the integrity and traditions of their rich culture.

Español

PERU: ARTESANAS TEJEN REDES VIRTUALES

Mientras el 70% de habitantes en los países desarrollados tienen acceso a Internet, en los países en vías de desarrollo apenas el 24 % accede a esta tecnología, llegando a reducirse incluso al 6% en los países con menor economía (Datos de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones 2012). Estas son solo algunas  de las cifras que evidencian la “brecha digital” existente que divide a las personas que tienen la posibilidad de beneficiarse de esta y otras Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación – TIC, del otro grupo que aún es incapaz de lograrlo. Y justamente esta “brecha digital” se amplía con las mujeres de zonas rurales, quienes por factores ligados a la pobreza y el género, tienen limitado el acceso y utilización de TICs que nos son tan cotidianas como por ejemplo la computadora, el internet, y el teléfono.

Mientras el 70% de habitantes en los países desarrollados tienen acceso a Internet, en los países en vías de desarrollo apenas el 24 % accede a esta tecnología, llegando a reducirse incluso al 6% en los países con menor economía (Datos de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones 2012). Estas son solo algunas  de las cifras que evidencian la “brecha digital” existente que divide a las personas que tienen la posibilidad de beneficiarse de esta y otras Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación – TIC, del otro grupo que aún es incapaz de lograrlo. Y justamente esta “brecha digital” se amplía con las mujeres de zonas rurales, quienes por factores ligados a la pobreza y el género, tienen limitado el acceso y utilización de TICs que nos son tan cotidianas como por ejemplo la computadora, el internet, y el teléfono.

Heifer Perú es consciente que esta brecha requiere atenderse no solo con el acceso a proyectos para la instalación de infraestructura y equipamiento tecnológico, sino también con acciones que posibiliten el fortalecimiento de capacidades de las personas para que adapten estas tecnologías a su contexto y las utilicen como instrumentos de desarrollo en sus pueblos.

Heifer puso las herramientas y las Mujeres desarrollaron las soluciones

Heifer Perú desde noviembre del 2012 enrumbó experiencias pilotos de incorporación de TICs para el desarrollo rural en proyectos que viene implementando.

El trabajo se centró en las personas y no en las tecnologías. Con las capacitaciones 39 mujeres artesanas de Puno y Cusco cambiaron la inseguridad inicial por una motivación creciente por aprender el uso de TIC tales como computadoras, laptops, impresoras, cámaras fotográficas y otros insumos que se les fueron entregadas. El camino no fue fácil, muchas aprendieron desde manejar el mouse, hasta lograr con la práctica manejar la computadora y el internet.

Actualmente mujeres artesanas organizadas en los pueblos más alejados de Puno y Cusco en el Perú utilizan estas TIC para mejorar sus estrategias de promoción y comercialización en artesanía.

“Hemos aprendido a escribir en la computadora, sacar nuestras cuentas de los precios de nuestra ropa: así también y enviarnos archivos por nuestros correos y conversar por Facebook.” – Lucia Mamani (43), Asociación de Artesanas Chapi Conduriri. Puno

Acceden a información de tendencias de moda para realizar novedosos diseños en prendas de alpacas, información que luego comparten con más de 100 mujeres artesanas miembros de sus organizaciones.

… aprendí todo lo del internet; me asombré de la variedad de ropa tejida que había, yo solo escribí chal y salió cantidad de chales, en todos los colores con diferentes diseños; escribí chompas igual; me quería copiar los modelos y aprendí a guardar en mi USB para verlo después, copié en Word para hacerlo imprimir y viendo del papel puedo tejer después el vestido.

– Isabel Subia (52), Presidenta de la Asociación Provincial de Mujeres Ricchary Warmi de Azángaro.

Falta de tiempo, dinero y mal estado de las carreteras dejaron de ser un obstáculo para ponerse en contacto con sus clientes y otras mujeres artesanas de pueblos dentro y fuera de sus regiones. A través de sus cuentas e-mail, Facebook y youtube las mujeres están saliendo virtualmente de sus pueblos sin tener que poner físicamente un pie fuera.

La aplicación de las TIC nos abrió muchas puertas, ya que gracias a los especialistas tenemos catálogos, Facebook, un canal de YouTube donde podemos mostrar nuestros trabajos y un correo electrónico donde la gente puede preguntarnos acerca de nuestros productos, con más capacitaciones esperamos que a corto plazo podamos vender por internet.

La voz de la mujeres se escucha en todo el pueblo

Sin temores y convencidas del valor de sus palabras realizan la locución de microprogramas radiales llegando a mujeres en comunidades tan alejadas donde la radio es el único medio de comunicación accesible.

Ahora nosotras también somos lideresas y tenemos un programa de radio llamado “nuestras voces también cuentan”, allí animamos a que más mujeres se unan a nuestra asociación “Tres Alpaquitas”, que sepan que no están solas, que las mujeres podemos sobresalir con la artesanía si estamos organizadas, les hablamos de artesanía, para que aprendan desde sus casas.

– Eufemia Espercilla (28), Presidenta de Asociación de artesanas Tres Alpaquitas. Marcapata – Cusco.

Mujeres que generan información 

Con todas estas experiencias las mujeres artesanas pasaron de ser solo receptoras de información a convertirse en importantes generadoras de conocimiento en sus pueblos, posibilitando que más mujeres artesanas miembros de sus 17 organizaciones locales accedan a esa información que las educa, fortalece y empodera.

Estos avances han provocado que los sueños de estas mujeres se hagan más grandes. Han creado las marcas de artesanía “Natural Pacha” y “Tres Alpaquitas” en Cusco, como forma de incluirse a un mercado que vaya más allá de sus localidades. Brindándonos la oportunidad de saber más de ellas y sumarnos a su red que nos llega desde Cusco y Puno.

Author

Madeline Munoz