Every week we feature a fun and/or educational activity you can try at home or in the classroom. In the latest edition of World Ark magazine, there is a story about a project in Senegal, where Heifer will distribute in total 12,000 sheep and goats and 12,500 poultry to 5,500 families, estimated to be the largest such animal distribution in Heifer’s history. Today's activity will teach you how to make your very own sheep money box, perhaps to save money to donate and bring real sheep to a family in need.

Materials You'll Need:

  • 1 large plastic bottle
  • masking tape
  • ruler
  • 2 cardboard tubes
  • PVA glue
  • 1 sheet of black tissue paper, torn into small pieces
  • Black card
  • 2 stick-on eyes
  • 1 large bag of cotton balls

Draw a rectangle onto a piece of masking tape. Stick it on the center of the plastic bottle, then cut out the rectangle (with help from an adult). Remove the tape. Flatten the two cardboard tubes, for the legs. Draw a diagonal line across each tube, then cut along the lines. Open up the four tube pieces. Put glue along the flat rims, then rest the bottle on the top and leave to dry for a half hour. Put glue on the the legs and layer tissue paper pieces on top. Once these are dry, cover the front half of the bottle in the same way. Draw two ear shapes onto the black card. Cut them out and make a small slit in each. Fold over the slit and glue the ears onto the sheep. Glue on the stick-on eyes and add cottonballs around the sheep, starting at the ears. When the glue is dry, your sheep bank is done.

For more details on this activity and others, go to Priddy Books blog.

To read about the sheep distribution and project in Senegal, check out The Day the Sheep Came in World Ark online.

Author

Linda Meyers

Linda Meyers, an Arkansas transplant originally from St. Louis, Mo., started working at Heifer International in 2011. She enjoys dragging her three children on nature hikes and snapping photos of them and everything around her. She has a bachelor’s degree in English has been “in the process” of writing the great American novel for 24 years.