If you've ever read the children's book Beatrice's Goat, you understand immediately what Heifer's work is meant to accomplish. With a small input such as a goat, a family in poverty soon has a way to grow income and move toward sustainability.

As we've mentioned before, Heifer is now lucky enough to have Beatrice Biira on our staff doing community engagement in New York.

Newsday, a daily newspaper that serves the New York metropolitan area, today published a column by Jennifer Wheary on Biira with the following intro:

At 28, Beatrice Biira has had experiences that most of us will never have in our entire lives. She's been on "60 Minutes," "Good Morning America" and "Oprah." She was the subject of an award-winning, bestselling 2001 children's book called "Beatrice's Goat." She's met celebrities and been featured in People magazine and The New York Times. She interned for Hillary Clinton when she was a U.S. senator and captured the attention of internationally renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University.

Sachs was so inspired by Biira that he created a theorem for her. The "Beatrice Theorem" simply and powerfully states that: "Small inputs can lead to large outcomes."

Check out the full column here, and please comment with suggestions on how Biira and other Heifer staff and volunteers can help even more families by telling others about Heifer's work.

Author

Donna Stokes

Donna Stokes is the managing editor of World Ark magazine. She has worked for Heifer International since September 2008 when she leaped over to the nonprofit world from a two-decade career in newspaper journalism.