Editor’s note: In Context is a new series designed to inform and educate you on Heifer’s work in each country we have a presence. Every two weeks we’ll tackle a different country and examine unique situations related to hunger and poverty, how Heifer works to address them as well as take some time to explore local culture and traditions. 

Population: 161 Million

Native greeting: Apni kemon asen? (How are you?)

National currency: Bangladeshi Taka

The People's Republic of Bangladesh is located in in south asia and is bordered by Burma and India with the Bay of Bengal to the south. Dhaka, the capital, is located in central Bangladesh and Bengali is the official language.

Bangladesh continues to be one of the least developed countries in South Asia. About a third of the country floods every year due to the monsoon rainy season, severely hindering economic development.

Half of the country's 161 million people live below the international poverty line and about 56% of Bangladeshi children are underweight. Luckily, The NGO sector in the country is very strong, and Heifer Bangladesh became an official country program in 2012.

Heifer Bangladesh

Heifer Interventions: Bullocks; dairy cows and goats

Issues addressed: Livestock management, sanitation; education awareness; gender and social justice and community development

The program strategy for Heifer Bangladesh involves scaling up program impact by empowering communities to take charge of their own development. And, because gender inequality is such a serious issue, Heifer projects will work exclusively with women's self-help groups.

There are currently five active projects in Bangladesh, providing inputs such as goats, chickens, dairy cows and vegetable seeds to over 1,200 families.

 

Author

Falguni Vyas

Falguni (sounds like "balcony") Vyas is from Atlanta, Georgia and began working with Heifer International in Little Rock as a copywriter in 2011. She received her master's degree at Istituto Marangoni in Milan, Italy and her bachelor's degree at Franklin College Switzerland in Lugano, Switzerland. She does not like writing about herself in the third person.