Some of my friends and colleagues would probably say I'm a bit obnoxious about food. I wouldn't say I'm a "foodie" or a "connoisseur," but I have been working over the past 10 years or so on improving the overall quality of the food I eat. To put it plainly, I have rules. Most of these rules are logical, but for some they're a little much. The problem is, once I know the backstory on something (like deli meats), I have a really hard time ever eating it again.

The genesis of my slow food revolution was a college course I took called Food and American Culture. I learned way too much. One of the big names we studied was Michael Pollan, who has only increased in his expertise since then. Surprisingly, I've yet to read his book, Food Rules, but I've picked up a few of his rules I've learned along the way (some of which were in previous books he'd authored). His overarching message is this: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."

Pollan now has an audio slideshow on his website with excerpts from his latest edition of the book, illustrated by Maria Kalman. Check it out for a visual depiction of "The fewer the feet, the better the meat."

Author

Brooke Edwards

Brooke Edwards is from Little Rock, Arkansas, and started working at Heifer International in 2009 as a writer. She has a master's in social work and a bachelor's degree in psychology. She is married, a mother of two, and a wannabe urban farmer, raising her own chickens and killing most of her vegetable crops.