Improved Animal Management

CORNERSTONE: IMPROVED ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Improved Animal Management

HOW IT WORKS:

In order for livestock to be a healthy and productive part of any farm, Heifer first ensures that the species and breed is an appropriate fit for the area and for the families who will receive the gift animals. Project participants then attend trainings to ensure they can provide the animals with adequate feed, water, shelter and health care. When animals are healthy and productive, families benefit and there is a favorable impact on the environment.

IN ACTION:

Training and preparation for livestock often takes the entire first year of a five-year Heifer project. Project participants learn animal health and husbandry, integration of livestock into the ecosystem and improvement of the environment. Preparations for animals include building shelters and planting fodder. Heifer also trains community animal health workers who can administer vaccinations and other medicines to keep gift animals healthy.

Projects & Families
Projects & Families

Throwback Thursday - Sending Heifers Overseas

When Heifer International was founded in 1944, Dan West and his fellow brethren started sending heifers overseas for war relief efforts. Seagoing cowboys would volunteer to help transport the animals! Heifer Int'l has now started purchasing the livestock within the local country, which helps funnel money back into the local economy where the animals are purchased. According to this advertisement in 1946, the cost of purchasing a heifer and sending it overseas was $160. Now a Heifer can be purchased within the country for $500.

Donors
Donors
Donors
Donors
Donors
Donors

Katherine Shares Why She Donated a Cow

I bought a cow! She’s being given away through Heifer International to a family in need of a reliable source of food and income. I’m giving this gift to honor you and others. We don’t need another cake or a check or small gifts, but other people in the world need sustainable food sources. Pick your favorite cow part and think of it as your part of a gift we are all giving. Why a cow? Because it is the symbol of Heifer International, and when I was 17 years old I attended a school where we were learning to live off the land. My job was to walk about a half mile to the barn, clean and feed Brownie the Cow, and milk her by hand. I then carried the buckets back, and, of course, repeated the whole process again each evening for a second milking. Our one cow gave us six gallons of milk per day. Merry Christmas! Submitted by Katherine Harris

Donors

Pastoralists in Sahel Losing Their Way

Writer Jocelyn Edwards and photographer Anne Ackermann traveled to Burkina Faso for World Ark to interview pastoralist Fulani families about how the changing climate affects their livelihoods. We interviewed these families to show the challenges pastoralists in the region face.